Does VRD benefit from Dual Core CPU's

marnold

New member
Hi Guy's,

Just wondering if VideoRedo would benefit much from a Dual Core CPU as opposed to a single core one?

I have read in the past that Video Redo is likely to be more disk bound than CPU, although I am thinknig of upgrading my AMD X64 3000+ given the recent price drops.



thanks, Mark
 

Anole

Moderator
By all means, do upgrade. You'll enjoy some pleasures.
Unfortunately, VideoReDo won't be a very big one.

I think one cpu might run the OS and disk I/O while the other does the video handling.
And, during some very unusual circumstances, you might see a marginal boost.
But for the most part, one CPU is just as good.

I have two Opterons, and what gives me a boost is the bigger cache.
Also, two SATA (II) hard drives will help the most.
Edit from one drive and save onto the other.
 

Danr

Administrator
Staff member
marnold said:
Hi Guy's,

Just wondering if VideoRedo would benefit much from a Dual Core CPU as opposed to a single core one?

I have read in the past that Video Redo is likely to be more disk bound than CPU, although I am thinknig of upgrading my AMD X64 3000+ given the recent price drops.

thanks, Mark
While saving output, VideoReDo is single-threaded so there's little direct benefit to dual cores. The editing portion of VRD is highly multi-threaded and will benefit from dual cores, especially when editing HD material. However, just like memory or disk, you can never have too much CPU power. We have a new Athlon dual core here in the lab, and while the saving edits isn't much faster, the system is much more responsive than our P4 to other apps while VRD is saving. Of course, 2GB of memory and a couple of fast SATA's don't hurt either.
 

Anole

Moderator
Okay, I guess I was wrong.
Sorry for the misinformation.

I based my observations on not seeing CPU usage much above 50% during a save where I was forcing massive re-encoding.
In other words, that would be one CPU fully saturated.
(this is not a condition a user would normally ever see in regular usage)
Of course, the system would still be responsive, as the other CPU would be available to respond to user requests.

Other than for tests, I don't have hi-def video to edit.
A fast CPU, large cache, much memory, fast multiple drives, and a better-than-average video card all combine to help the system seem responsive, whether one cpu or two.
I look forward to the day when I can see the benefit while working with hi def material.

I do sometimes either start-up another VRD while one is saving, or run DVD Labs to test-author part of my project during a VRD edit or save.
Depending on the actual combination of tasks you are performing, VRD may or may not respond pretty close to normal.
With dual cpus it's never a lack of processor resource that gets you.
It's all the applications fighting for the hard disk drives.
And I say drives, not drive.
If you are serious about editing and authoring, and have a dual cpu but don't run two drives, you are really missing the boat! ;)

Dual Opteron 246, 2000mhz, 1mb cache each, 1gb of ram each, & dual sata drives.
 
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marnold

New member
Hi Guys,

Thanks for the info, it seems it might be worthwile given current pricing etc,
I don't actually do a huge amount of re-coding, more just cutting adds out of my DTV recordings and saving them to disk for later viewing.
I have noticed that my CPU usage does hit 100% at times when using VRD which does make doing other things in the background a litle sluggish.

My current system is a AMD 3000+, 2 gigs RAM, 2 Seageate SATA-II hard drives in a raid-0 configuration and I also have a 3rd hard drive which is an older 80gig PATA 7200rpm drive (from my old PC) which I use for the windows swap file and as a place to save video edits to etc, apart from that my video card isn't too fancy just a nvidia 6200 card as I don't do any gaming etc.



Cheers, Mark
 
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