What's test way to get TIVO recordings to DVD?

dae06

New member
Here's how I currently do it. This takes forever and I hope there is a much more efficient (faster) way of doing this.
Currently, I transfer my recorded TIVO shows to my laptop. An hour show takes close to an hour to download to the laptop. From there, I click and drag the files to VideoReDo. This takes ~1 more hour to download. After editing commercials out I use Nero 6 to deliver the file to my DVD burner to burn, this takes another hour. So for a one hour show, it takes ~ 3 hours to get to my DVD. Is there a better way?
 

Danr

Administrator
Staff member
Here's what it takes me to do a 1 hr show from Tivo.

1) Download from Tivo the PC ~1 hr. Not much you can do about this since Tivo uses a USB 1 connection. Use lower quality recording to minimize download time.

2) Load the downloaded file into VideoReDo and remove commercials (about 5-10 minutes).

3) Save the File from VideoReDo (about 5-8 minutes).

4) Author to DVD, about 20 minutes using DVDLab. If using new VRD authoring tool (oops not available yet :D ), you can eliminate step 2.

5) Burn DVD, about 10-15 minutes. Doesn't matter which application you use.
 

Anole

Moderator
Just to rub it in....

I download from my Dish PVR via USB 2 (not commercially supported)
A one hour show takes two minutes and is about one gigabyte.

I edit with VideoReDo - 10 minutes(?) all manual labor.
The VRD save takes maybe 2..3 minutes on fast drives and a hot computer.
The edited show is about 42 minutes and around 800mb.
Also, I save in .mpv/.mpa format as it's quicker for DLP to digest.

I likewise author with DVD Labs, using the native format provided, so I don't have to re-encode.
I fiddle around with it for maybe 20 minutes, importing multiple shows, making a nice menu, et al.
The actual authoring step takes about 10 minutes of un-attended computer time, for 4..5 one-hour-long shows.

Burn the resultant output of DVD Labs using Nero Burning ROM.
The computer takes around 20 minutes between the burn and verify...
But that's for a 4gb DVD, not just one 1 hr show.


If I want to make a quick 'n dirty Double Feature disc, with two movies from a movie channel, that's even quicker.
The movies are longer, but only need to be trimmed at front and end (no commercials to edit).
All times above are similarly reduced, since two movies comes to maybe 3gb or less.


It's not that DVD Labs is a super-fast authoring tool, so much as the fact that it won't re-encode your work, so you feed in proper data and live with what you get out.
I process 544x480 video, and your TiVo can output 480x480 or 352x480(?)
Assuming your DVD players can handle the format you start with, -not- re-encoding is the way to go.
Also, reading from one fast drive and writing to a different fast drive helps both VRD when it saves, and DLP when it authors.
A really hot computer with big cache and plenty of ram doesn't hurt, either.

Doing the same job on my anemic laptop takes 3..4..5 times longer.
 
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dlflannery

Moderator
@ dae6

Here's what it takes me to do a 1 hr show from Tivo.
1) Download from Tivo the PC ~1 hr. Not much you can do about this since Tivo uses a USB 1 connection. Use lower quality recording to minimize download time.
2) Load the downloaded file into VideoReDo and remove commercials (about 5-10 minutes).
3) Save the File from VideoReDo (about 5-8 minutes).
4) Author to DVD, about 20 minutes using DVDLab. If using new VRD authoring tool (oops not available yet :D ), you can eliminate step 2.
5) Burn DVD, about 10-15 minutes. Doesn't matter which application you use.
Nero is noted for re-encoding your files (another hour). DVDLab doesn't do this but it costs $$. If you want a free substitute for DVDLabs try DVDStyler (just Google). Get the latest Beta Version for Windows (1.5beta7). Search this forum and the TivoCommunity forum for tips on how to use it. Many satisfied users! It will be just as fast as DVDLabs. Free program imgburn is recommended for burning the .iso (or DVD folder) to the DVD. Burning directly from an authoring program is NOT recommended. Tends to overload some computers.

Can't imagine why it would take an hour to load your file into VideoReDo. Did I misunderstand?
 

dae06

New member
Nero is noted for re-encoding your files (another hour). DVDLab doesn't do this but it costs $$. If you want a free substitute for DVDLabs try DVDStyler (just Google). Get the latest Beta Version for Windows (1.5beta7). Search this forum and the TivoCommunity forum for tips on how to use it. Many satisfied users! It will be just as fast as DVDLabs. Free program imgburn is recommended for burning the .iso (or DVD folder) to the DVD. Burning directly from an authoring program is NOT recommended. Tends to overload some computers.

Can't imagine why it would take an hour to load your file into VideoReDo. Did I misunderstand?
That was my mistake. It only takes 10 minutes or so to load file onto VideoReDo. Sorry :) , But my 7 GB file took 4 hours and 35 minutes to burn using Nero 6 lastnight :mad: . Does this sound right or is there a faster way to burn (DVDStyler, is this a burning software)?
 

dlflannery

Moderator
That was my mistake. It only takes 10 minutes or so to load file onto VideoReDo. Sorry :) , But my 7 GB file took 4 hours and 35 minutes to burn using Nero 6 lastnight :mad: . Does this sound right or is there a faster way to burn (DVDStyler, is this a burning software)?
Please supply some data:
1. What format is your file (Ctrl-L after loaded into VRD)?
2. What speed is your burner burning at? (1X, 2X, 4X or ??)

I never wanted DVDStyler to burn directly to disc. Always (for any authoring software) burn to .iso (DVD Image file) or to "files" or "DVD folders". Then you can use either Nero or Imgburn to burn the file(s) to DVD. There is no significant time savings by burning directly to disc from an authoring program, and it causes problems on many computers because they can't keep up.

I'm assuming you were burning directly to disc from Nero when it took 4+ hrs. This is most likely because Nero decided to re-encode your file to a different format (probably 720x480, the most common DVD format). It possibly could be due to your burner drive burning very slowly. I don't know about Nero, but if you use Imgburn to burn the file(s) to disc it will tell you the speed your burner drive is operating at.

If your file is 7 GB it will not fit on a (most common) single-layer DVD disc. Thus it must be re-encoded unless you are using double-layer discs. I have no experience with DL burning so wouldn't want to advise you anything about what any of this software can do. If you are actually burning to SL discs and don't want to take the time to re-encode, then you could consider splitting the video into two parts (which VideoReDo can do quickly) and putting it on 2 discs.

Not only is re-encoding going to take a lot of time but it has to result in a loss of quality if you are reducing a 7 GB file to a 4.2 GB to fit on a SL disc.
 
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dae06

New member
I have the I/O Magic IDVD16DDBE burner, I believe it is a 16X speed burner, but the actual burn speed, I don't know.
The file is (I believe) .mpg before and after VDR. To tell you the honest truth, most of the things I read about extentions, files, etc. go right over my head so I need someone to hold my hand (so to speak) when it comes to this stuff.
If I understand correctly, I should not send directly to the burner from VRD. Instead I should save the video as an .iso file (where?) and then send that file to the DVD burner. Is that correct?
I did burn it to a DL disc (8.5 GB).
 
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dlflannery

Moderator
I have the I/O Magic IDVD16DDBE burner, I believe it is a 16X speed burner, but the actual burn speed, I don't know.
The file is (I believe) .mpg before and after VDR. To tell you the honest truth, most of the things I read about extentions, files, etc. go right over my head so I need someone to hold my hand (so to speak) when it comes to this stuff.
If I understand correctly, I should not send directly to the burner from VRD. Instead I should save the video as an .iso file (where?) and then send that file to the DVD burner. Is that correct?
I did burn it to a DL disc (8.5 GB).
VRD is just a video editor. The process flow is:
Edit(VRD) --> Author (Nero or DVDStyler or DVDLabs) -> Burn-to-disc (Nero, Imgburn).
There is some confusion because the word "burn" is used two ways:
1. When the authoring program creates the files that will later be written to DVD disc.
2. When the files are actually written to the DVD disc.

If you got a good DVD DL disc with what you did, and your files are this large (7 GB), then you are probably doing about as well as can be done.

With Nero, when you author the DVD, output it ("burn it") to a DVD Image file or .iso or ISO file. Then use Nero (or Imgburn) to burn the ISO file to the DVD as a separate process. Possibly you don't need to do this as two separate steps with your particular software and hardware -- apparently you have already succeeded doing it as a single step.

There are two possibilities for speeding up your process.
1. Author the DVD files without re-encoding. Whether this will work depends on the resolution of your videos (e.g. 480x480 or ???) and how tolerant your DVD player is to videos that are not strictly DVD resolution. That is why I asked you to load one of your TiVo files into VideoReDo and hit Ctrl-L and get the resolution. To author without re-encoding you will have to use either DVDStyler or DVDLabs. I don't think you can get Nero to do that. I have used DVDStyler but only for SL, so I can't be sure how it would handle DL (which you need for 7GB).

2. Determine that your burner is operating slowly and fix the problem. To do this you need to know what speed it is operating at. If you burn from .iso to disc as a separate process you can determine this by just timing how long it takes to burn. Possibly Nero tells you the burn speed (?). I know imgburn wlll tell you.

I would also advise you to post this problem on the Tivo Community Forum . There is a Nero user there who knows exactly what it can do.
 

Anole

Moderator
NERO Clarification

NERO actually lets you choose the burn speed.
....and gives you a list of which speeds your drive supports.

And that's another problem with "Nero".
People casually use that name when they are talking about their authoring package, or their actual burning package.

"Nero Burning ROM" is the CD/DVD burning package that I use.
I'm not sure what their authoring package is called.
And yes, when you get their full suite, it all comes on one disc and installs all at once.
 

dae06

New member
Stupid question: How do I make an .iso file for the video I have on VDR. I played around trying to change the file, but couldn't even find out what the current extention is. I believe it is a mpg. Here is what I want to do. Transfer video from TIVO to laptop (done)> transfer to VRD and edit (done)> change file extention (how and where do I save the file once it's converted?)> use Imgburn to create DVD from the .iso file (never used this before, I have always used Nero directly from VRD). Does this sound like the correct way to do this?
Again, my problem now is: how do I change my video that edited in VRD to an .iso file and where do I save it to so I can send it to Imgburn (or Nero if need be). :confused: Thanks
 

dlflannery

Moderator
Did you notice this in one of my prior posts?

Edit(VRD) --> Author (Nero or DVDStyler or DVDLabs) -> Burn-to-disc (Nero, Imgburn).

You are leaving out the Authoring process. There is where you "create the DVD" (file structure -- not the disc) and produce the ISO (.iso) file by "burning to Image" or "burning to ISO", the language depends on which authoring program. Whatever the language, it is the output of the authoring program. It doesn't matter where you put your files (on hard drive) as long as you know how to find them. The extension of a file loaded into VRD is the extension of the file you loaded in. When you save the file from VRD you create a different file and it has an extension depending on what type of file you choose to save, e.g., .mpg, .vob, etc. If you are using Nero, save as .mpg.
 
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